Sippin’ at The Stump

THE STUMP
If you haven’t tried this crisp and earthy goodness, you’re missing out! Bring your water jugs to The Stump and get in line to fill up and sip!

BY KATIE GERARD

One of North Ogden City’s famously known attractions is “The Stump.” Now, a fiberglass replica, the original stump was drilled in about 1930 by Clarence Barker for irrigation purposes. This centennial well located in the heart of our city is an artesian well, meaning that the water flows under natural pressure and doesn’t need assistance from a pump, power, or any other automation. The water runs to a discharge, routing the unused water to the North Ogden Canal that runs on the north side of the well. From there, the water makes its way through Pleasant View down to Smith and Edwards, and eventually ends up in the wetlands.

Whether it’s 95 degrees in the middle of July or 15 degrees in January, there is always a line of people waiting to fill up their jugs and bottles with this fresh-tasting water. Last spring, our water department reduced the flow due to the drought conditions, and even with this reduction, the stump is currently flowing at 40 gallons per minute. This transient noncommunity water source is tested twice a month for bacteria and sampled every August for nitrates.

Many people have asked why there isn’t an automated valve on the stump. The reason behind this is that there would be a two-minute delay prior to water being discharged due to the requirement set by the The Division of Drinking Water. This requirement says that a two-minute “pump to waste” cycle must be run prior to putting the water into a distribution system to prevent rust, minerals, and bacteria from being in our drinking water.

If you haven’t tried this crisp and earthy goodness, you’re missing out! Bring your water jugs to The Stump and get in line to fill up and sip!

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